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Review: The Bleak Midwinter by L C Tyler

Bleak Midwinter

The fifth John Grey historical mystery

1668.

John Grey is now a Justice of the Peace and lives in the manor house he has inherited on his mother’s death with his new wife, Aminta.

As the village is cut off from the rest of the world by a heavy snowfall, George Barwell is discovered dead in the woods. Grey is called to examine the horribly disfigured body amidst the rumours that the attack has been the work of the Devil as the victim had been cursed by reputed witch Alice Mardike just days before his violent death.

As Barwell’s father-in-law leads the villagers into kidnapping Alice and throwing her into the millpond to see if she floats as a witch or drowns as an innocent woman, Grey agrees to investigate the murder: his main suspect is the very man leading the witch hunt.

But if Grey can’t solve the mystery of George Barwell’s death within a week, Mardike will be tried for witchcraft – and the sentence has already been decided . . .

My thoughts. . .

I love these John Grey Historical Mysteries. Not only are they set in an unusual period – the 17th Century, but they are also riddled with wry humour. This is a difficult balancing act to achieve – both historical veracity and laughs, but this book has both, along with an exciting plot that keeps you guessing until the end.

The theme of this one is that John Grey is trying to uncover who murdered a man in the snow, and won’t give up even when the villagers are convinced it is the result of a curse by local witch Alice Mardike. They are adamant she is to blame and, not content with a ducking, are keen to subject her to the witch’s usual fate. Grey has to prevent them and ensure justice prevails.

There is a lovely sense of hierarchy in the novel between the rich and poor, the upper and lower classes, and between women and men. This is delightfully turned on its head by Grey’s wife Aminta who comes up with the best leads.

Altogether highly recommended, especially for Christmas.

 

Bonus! Here’s the video of King’s College Choir singing the hymn.

If you are interested in the 17th Century, you might also like my posts this week on

Animals in the Great Fire of 1666

The First Women in the Theatre